History of Judaism

The Ph.D. program in Judaic Studies prepares students for academic careers in teaching and research. The program offers three tracks:

  1. Late Biblical / Post-Biblical Judaism
  2. Rabbinic-Medieval Judaism
  3. Contemporary Judaism

Among the fields specifying these tracks are: Archaeology of Roman Palestine; Second Commonwealth Studies; Rabbinic/Talmudic literature; Hellenistic Judaism; and Medieval Jewish History, Philosophy, Mysticism, American Judaism and Zionism.

For more information regarding Judaic Studies programs and activities, visit the Center for Jewish Studies.

Major Field Requirements

  • Course Work
    • 4 courses each semester for a minimum of 2 academic years
  • Languages
    • Classical language:
      • For students focusing in Late Antiquity, demonstration of reading fluency by 2 semesters of advanced course work in New Testament or Classical Greek or Syriac
      • For students focusing in the Medieval period, demonstration of reading fluency by 2 semesters of advanced course work in either Latin or Arabic
      • For students in Contemporary Judaism, demonstration of reading fluency by 2 semesters of advanced course work or exam in modern Hebrew or Yiddish
    • Modern language:
      • As demonstrated by exam and course work, reading competency in German and either French or a substitute modern European language
  • Responsible Conduct of Research Training
  • Preliminary Examinations
    • 4 written components: comprehensive, internal minor, external minor, and dissertation area
      • For students focusing in Late Antiquity, the Comprehensive Exam will cover the history of Jewish civilization from the Persian Period until the Arab conquest of Palestine
      • For students focusing in the Medieval period, the Comprehensive Exam will cover the history of Jewish civilization from the Maccabees until the expulsion from Spain in 1492
      • For students focusing in Contemporary Judaism, the Comprehensive Exam will cover the Enlightenment to the present
    • 1 oral component that reviews all four of the written exams
  • Dissertation

Inside Minor Requirements

  • 2 courses
    • Students are encouraged to select RELIGION 220 or RELIGION 221 as one of these courses

History of Judaism

Sean Burrus: "Remembering the Righteous: Sarcophagus Sculpture and Jewish Patrons in the Roman World." 2016. Co-advisors: Eric Meyers, Mary Boatwright

Alan Todd: "Feasts and the Social Order in Early Jewish Society (ca. Third Century B.C.E. - Third Century C.E.)." 2014. Advisor Eric Meyers

Benjamin Gordon: "Sacred Land Endowments and Field Consecrations in Early Judaism." 2013. Advisor: Eric Meyers

Sunday, November 18, 2018 - 4:00pm
Rubenstein Library Breedlove Room 349
Professor Krutikov (U Michigan) is currently working on a study of the Soviet Yiddish author Der Nister, A Witness to the People: Der Nister and Soviet Yiddish Literature under Stalin, 1929-1949. His other research projects explore literary representations of the urban spaces of Kiev, Vilnius, and... Read More »
Sunday, January 13, 2019 - 4:00pm
Rubenstein Library Breedlove Room 349
The NC Jewish Studies Seminar welcomes Yair Mintzker (Princeton U.) Yair Mintzker studies the history of early modern and modern Germany, with particular interest in the Sattelzeit (1750-1850). Professor Mintzker is the author of The Defortification of the German City, 1689-1866 (New York:... Read More »
Sunday, March 3, 2019 - 4:00pm
Rubenstein Library Breedlove Room 349
The NC Jewish Studies Seminar welcomes Martina Steer (University of Vienna) to discuss her paper "Moses Mendelssohn: A Modern Icon through the Ages." Martina Steer is a faculty member at the Vienna School of International Studies and a current Fellow at the Remarque Institute at NYU. She received... Read More »